The Beach Times

A Guide to Festivals and Events in P-Town
Posted by Kinlin Grover | Tuesday, March 20, 2018


Provincetown, or P-Town, has long been a favorite vacation destination for members of the LGBTQ community, principally due to the town's open and tolerant attitude. In fact, the growth of the area's gay and lesbian community goes all the way back to the 1920s, a time when the country was much less welcoming and tolerant. 

In those early years, vacationers and residents alike were able to experience the freedom to live their lives without judgment, while participating in the area's thriving arts and culture scene.

Today, Provincetown remains an inclusive town that retains its spot as a cultural and artistic hub on Cape Cod, while providing a whole series of events and festivals to celebrate the past, present, and future of the both the LGBTQ community and the area as a whole.

P-Town Spring Events on Cape Cod

Springtime means the return of good weather to the Cape and the people of P-Town know that this is when festival season begins. The event that kicks it all off is CabaretFest, which takes place in late May or early June and involves a series of concerts, parties, and workshops at The Crown & Anchor, a building containing seven different gay bars and nightclubs. Performances and parties tend to fill up quickly, so you'll want to book your tickets and Cape Cod vacation rental much earlier in the year.

The Provincetown International Film Festivalattracts filmmakers from all over the country, as well as the globe, and has become one of the United States' preeminent film festivals. The festival produces a wide variety of film types while doing an excellent job of highlighting the area's rich history as a fishing village, gay and lesbian haven, and colony of the arts.

Just as spring comes to an end, and summer kicks off, comes the Provincetown Portuguese Festival and Blessing of the Fleet, a four-day gathering filled with dancing, concerts, parades, and dining. The event ends with a bishop blessing the town's fishing and lobstering fleets for the year, which is a nod to the area's Portuguese fishing village heritage. 

Summer Events in Provincetown

As we move into summer, P-Town’s festivals surely take flight, and it all starts with the 4th of July Celebrations. Independence Week is full of events at the town's various nightclubs, including pool parties and performances by a plethora of gay DJs. If you plan on spending the entire week on the Cape, you can pick up a pass to every event at a discounted price. Independence Week also involves the annual fireworks display, which takes place at Provincetown Harbor.

Provincetown Bear Week is a nationally recognized festival that actually last for nine days and is full of pool parties and special events, including guest DJs and leather nights, at various local dance clubs. The festival is basically a week full of parties, and since it takes place in the middle of July, it's the perfect time to let loose.

Provincetown Festival ParadeFamilies come in all different forms and Provincetown's annual Family Week is the world's largest gathering of LGBTQ parents. This week-long event, held in late July and early August, provides family-friendly fun and welcomes families of all types. Games, crafts, dining, and workshops are all part of the festival, and there is even the chance for the kids to do some whale watching. 

The grandest festival in P-Town is Carnival Week. This week-long festival occurs in mid-August and attracts roughly 90,000 people to the town for its pool parties, cruises, parade, costume balls, and craft fairs. There are also plenty of dining options, along with nightlife that often features performances by icons of the gay community. If you plan on staying in Provincetown during the event, you'll have to reserve your vacation rentals well in advance.  

As summer comes to a close, the Afterglow Alternative Performance Arts Festival takes center stage. This festival highlights LGBTQ performers who might not have an extensive national following but are talented nonetheless. Close to 20 different performances take place over the week-long event.

Get to Know P-Town’s Fall Events

Just because summer is over doesn’t mean that P-Town shuts down, as there is always a reason to head to the Cape’s northern tip. Early to mid October means it's time for Women's Week, a multi-day festival with parties, comedy shows, special dining events, and concerts. There's even tours of the famous dunes of the Cape Cod National Seashore followed by bonfires on the beach, which is an amazing experience for anyone who has never participated.

The Fantasia Fair is an October conference designed for those questioning their genders, nonbinary-gendered individuals, and trans-gendered people. Many of the events are free, and the conference as a whole is a support system for those who are considering or have already made a life-altering choice in regards to their gender. 

One of the area’s newer festivals is the Provincetown Annual Day of the Dead Performing Arts Festival. The festival begins in mid-October and runs into early November. Exhibitions taking place throughout this two-week period include workshops, a parade, a dance, and a theatre performance. Keep in mind that all of the events, except for the seminars, take place in early November.

Some Provincetown Winter Events

Christmas time in Provincetown is something considerably different, as the Holly Folly Weekend, a free event complete with a Speedo run on Commercial Street and performances by the Gay Men's Chorus, kicks it all off. This event extends throughout the first weekend of December and also provides an excellent chance to see the decorations that local businesses have been able to come up with throughout the year. You can also find some great deals when looking for that special Christmas gift.

If you don't have any plans for New Year's Eve, First Light Provincetown is well worth a gander. This festival takes place over a six-day period leading up to the big day and involves drag bingo, a polar bear swim, live music, comedy events, and theater performances. There's even a fireworks display on the beach and a dance party, so it's well worth having a look if you're in the area.

Something for Everyone

Other events taking place throughout the year in the area include a dance party at the Pilgrim Monument, a leather weekend, and an international jazz festival, so there's something for people in all walks of life.

While P-Town is the country’s preeminent gay and lesbian community, it is also highly inclusive, and there unquestionably is something for everyone. So, whether you’re a member of the LGBTQ community or you just want to experience something different on your vacation and show your support, Provincetown is unmistakably worth checking out in any season.



Cape Cod Festivals Festivals Provincetown

Thinking Ahead to Summer on Cape Cod
Posted by Kinlin Grover | Wednesday, January 3, 2018


With cold temperatures causing problems throughout much of the northern United States, planning your summer vacation might not be a priority. After all, even though we know the cold isn't permanent and sunny days will come again, it's tough to get in the mood to book a beachfront vacation home if you've just finished shoveling six inches of snow.

The truth is that there's no better time to book your vacation than right now because you'll find more rentals available and you can get an early start on planning your activities. In addition, organizing a vacation immediately gives you something to look forward to as you suffer through a few more months of winter.

To help get you in the mood, we're going to use this space to remind you of just how exquisite Cape Cod is in the summer. Here are a few of the things that you can look forward to on the Cape in 2018.

Hit the BeachesCape Cod Beach Summertime

No matter where you choose to stay on the Cape this summer, you are sure to find a beach nearby. Some beaches are busier and livelier than others, but you are sure to find the exact seafront experience you are looking for if you plan early.

As part of the Cape Cod National Seashore, Race Point Beach features a scenic shore, bike trails, and sand dunes. Swimming and surfing are both possible at the beach, although there is a bit of a dropoff, so it might not be ideal for those with small children. This particular beach gets sun all day long in the summer, making it a sunbather's dream.

Mayflower Beach in Dennis is one of the calmer beaches on The Cape and is popular with families because of its shallow water. The beach also has a boardwalk, making it easy to get to the water from its expansive parking lot. If you have children and are staying in Dennis, this is your best bet.

Sitting in the Orleans area, Nauset Beach is a 10-mile-long stretch of sand featuring calm water that is great for swimming. Surfing and off-roading are possible at the beach, as well, making it a choice for those who wish to relax and those who want adventure alike.

Visit Museums and Monuments

Of course, it's not all fun in the sun when visiting Cape Cod, as your vacation can be educational, as well. Since this part of the country is where the pilgrims first settled, you won't find more history anywhere else.

Located in Sandwich, Heritage Museums & Gardens is a former plantation that is now a scenic garden that is open to the public. The museum has a collection of classic cars, an art collection, and working historic carnival rides.

Built sometime between 1907 and 1910, Pilgrim Monument is part of the Provincetown Museum and was created to commemorate the landing of the pilgrims in 1620. The monument remains the tallest granite structure in the entire country.

Like pirates? Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth is one of The Cape's newest museums and contains real treasure from an 18th-century shipwreck. The museum is loaded with history and is well worth checking out during the summer.

Experience the Annual EventsProvincetown Carnival Parade

Cape Cod is known for its annual events and festivals, giving locals and visitors alike something special to do during the summer. If any of these events excite you, book your vacation rental now, so you don't miss out.

Concerts, animals, food, and carnival rides, the Barnstable County Fair truly has it all. The fair takes place in late July every year and provides fun for the entire family.

In mid August, the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra comes to town for the annual Pops by the Sea concert at Hyannis Green Village. You'll want to buy your tickets to this event well in advance, particularly if you plan on attending the pre-concert luncheon.

Provincetown becomes a party town every August during Carnival Week. This annual festival attracts 90,000 people to the area for its parade, cruises, and dance parties. Costumes, floats, and food vendors make the events taking place over the course of the week well worth a visit.

Do Some Hiking, Fishing, and Boating

Of course, getting out there and keeping active in the outdoors is all part of a Cape Cod summer. Going for a bike ride on the Shining Sea Bikeway, hopping aboard the Island Queen Ferry, which travels between Falmouth and Martha's Vineyard, or renting a boat in Wellfleet Harbor are well worth doing during the summer.

No matter which part of Cape Cod you end up staying on, you'll have easy access to some of the best hiking, fishing, and boating opportunities in the entire country.

Look Forward to Warmer Weather

Every day that goes by means we are closer to summer on Cape Cod. While you still have a few months to go, the countdown is on, and before you know it, you'll be relaxing on the beach, enjoying fresh seafood, and taking in everything that summer on the Cape has to offer.

Start planning your Cape Cod summer vacation early in 2018, and you can avoid missing out on the perfect vacation rental on the ideal part of The Cape. By putting your vacation together now, you can make the most of your time on Cape Cod this summer. Visit Kinlin Grover Cape Cod Vacation Rentals and book now. You'll be glad you did!



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Cape Cod and Cranberries
Posted by Kinlin Grover | Saturday, November 25, 2017


For many, Cape Cod conjures up images of sand, sun, and relaxation, thanks to its location on the ocean and abundance of beaches. And, let’s face it, that’s a fair assessment, as Cape Cod is one of the nation’s more popular and scenic oceanfront areas, particularly during the summer months.

There’s more to Cape Cod than beaches and relaxation, however. While summer tourism is perhaps the most prominent industry on The Cape, it's not the only one, nor is it the oldest.

The cranberry bogs are as old as Cape Cod itself and remain a significant attraction and export. Cranberry farming is linked to the tourism industry through the various festivals and tours found in the region, as well.

The next time you visit Chatham, Harwich Port, or anywhere else on The Cape, make sure that you stop by a cranberry bog to learn about this superfood and its history in the area, while sampling some locally harvested cranberries.

You won't regret it.

History of Cranberries on Cape Cod

Cape Cod is one of the first places settled by European pilgrims arriving in what is now North America, and cranberries are a native crop in the region, so it makes sense that there is a lot of history regarding this fruit.

Cranberries and Cape Cod in the fall.Referred to as sasumuneash by Native Americans, the berry was first used for its medicinal qualities. In 1816, Henry Hall was the first to cultivate the fruit when he built fences around fields of wild cranberries to protect them from wildlife. The plants thrived under these conditions, and by 1820, Hall was able to ship 30 barrels of the product to New York to sell on the local market.

From there, cultivated cranberry bogs began popping up all over the place, stimulating the local economy when the ship-building industry, an important job-providing industry on Cape Cod in the 1800s, slowed down.

By the 1850s, cultivated cranberry bogs were everywhere on Cape Cod, with the product being shipped all over the eastern United States.

Cape Cod Cranberry Events and Festivals

Festivals and other events go hand-in-hand with the cranberry harvesting season, as locals and visitors alike get together to celebrate another successful season of cranberry production. Organized festivals provide something to do on Cape Cod in the autumn, too.

The Harwich Cranberry Festival is a music festival and craft fair that coincides with the annual cranberry harvest. Admission to the festival is free, and it lasts for two days in September. Wine, beer, and food are sold at the event, as well.

The annual Cranberry Harvest Celebration takes place on Columbus Day weekend and has become a tradition to the people of Cape Cod. The festival is educational, as visitors can watch the harvesting of the berries, and numerous displays are set up to explain the significance of cranberry crops. Cooking demonstrations, helicopter rides, craft fairs, and a farmers' market are among the activities found over the course of the weekend.

There is also a music festival, pony rides, a train, and wagon rides, so the entire family will find something to enjoy. You can even wade into a cranberry bog, should you be into that sort of thing.

Cranberry Bogs and Tours

When the cranberry harvest begins around Labor Day every year, the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers’ Association puts out a list of cranberry bogs that you can visit. Tours are available at many of these bogs, providing insight into the Cape Cod’s vibrant cranberry producing history.

Annie's Crannies, which sits in Dennis, the home of the cultivated cranberry, is a working cranberry farm with an on-site gift shop selling fresh fruit. The farm uses antique screening equipment to check the quality of the berries picked, and even sells honey and beeswax candles.

Local farmers Leo & Andrea Cakounes have a bog in Harwich that is known as the largest organic cranberry farm on Cape Cod. Daily tours run in the spring, summer, and fall and provide insight into the work it takes and the equipment used to create a fully-functional cranberry farm.

A great place to learn about the history of cranberry production on the Cape is Brooks Academy Museum. The museum has artifacts, exhibits, and interactive displays, making it a highly-accessible location for guests of all ages. In October, the institution puts on cranberry bog tours, as well.

Cranberry Vacation on Cape Cod

If you’ve ever wanted to learn more about the history of cranberries on Cape Cod and Massachusetts in general, fall is the time to visit area because you'll find many different events to experience.

By taking a tour or hitting up a festival, you can discover more about this native plant species and impress your friends when you know the difference between Early Blacks and Howes varieties of cranberries.

Cape Cod is waiting for you



Cape Cod Fall Festivals Vacation

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