The Beach Times

There’s More Here Than Just Cape Cod
Posted by Kinlin Grover | Thursday, February 15, 2018


While Cape Cod is eastern Massachusetts' top attraction, and with good reason, areas off The Cape that are worth checking out if you're in the region. Much like on Cape Cod, there is always something happening or somewhere to visit during the summer, so if you want to change things up a little bit, cross the Bourne Bridge and do some exploring. You could even choose to rent a vacation property off Cape, in Onset, Marion, or Mattapoisett and commute whenever you want to visit the beaches, trails, and atmosphere that Cape Cod has to offer.

Events and Activities in Onset Village  

When the weather in Onset Village warms up, it can only mean one thing: the Summer of Love Concert Series. The series runs Wednesday nights between the end of June and the end of August, bringing regional and national acts through the area. Every concert takes place at the Onset Band Shell and shows are free and family friendly, ensuring that concert-goers of all ages have a good time.

If you’d like a little more adventure, consider taking one of the canal cruises through the area. These cruises leave from Onset Town Pier near Onset Beach and run through the waterway under both Sagamore Bridge and Bourne Bridge, all the way to Cape Cod Bay. You'll see Scusset Beach Fish Pier, the Vertical Lift Railroad Bridge, and the Sandwich Boat Basin along the way.

Since 1992, the Onset Blues Festival has been a fixture in the area. The festival, which runs in early August, attracts some significant players in the blues music scene. It also has food and drink vendors, in addition to shopping opportunities. A good time is had by all at this festival, so make sure you get your tickets early if you plan to attend.

Slow Things Down in Marion

Just south of Marion’s town centre is Silvershell Beach. This beach isn’t very big, and there is a private resort nearby, but it provides outstanding views of Sippican Harbor. If the beaches of Cape Cod are too busy for your liking, give Marion a try for a quieter experience.

When shopping for souvenirs, Dean Ross Home is worth a stop. The house is home to all kinds of unique gift ideas, with many of the items available sharing a nautical theme. A number of other stores and shops are in the area around Dean Ross Home, so this area provides a pleasant, small-town retail experience.

Spend Some Time in Mattapoisett

No matter where you're staying in the area, Old Rochester Farmers Market in Mattapoisett is something you must experience. Between early December and the end of April, the winter market runs twice a month on Saturdays. The summer market runs every Tuesday from early June until late October. Both markets feature local produce, crafts, meats, and live entertainment and take place at Old Rochester Regional Junior High School.

Shellfishing is a favorite pastime in Mattapoisett and is worth trying if you’re in the area. Before heading out, make sure you know which areas are restricted and have the proper permits in place. Keep in mind that you’ll have to jump through some hoops and apply in-person if you’re not a local resident. Taking the time to get your permit will give you the chance to grab some of the world’s best seafood, however, so it’s well worth the effort.

The middle of July brings Harbor Days to Mattapoisett, courtesy of the Mattapoisett Lions Club. The two-day festival is held at Shipyard Park and features an artisan market, food vendors, live entertainment and a raffle draw. This is a fun, family-friendly event that provides a full weekend of entertainment. If you're lucky, you might catch a fish fry or lobster-eating opportunity while you're there.

Just Beyond Cape Cod

Your Cape Cod holiday doesn’t have to be spent entirely on the Cape because the surrounding towns provide a similar, yet somewhat different, experience.

Each of these towns in under 20 minutes from Bourne, so you won't spend the entire day driving from place to place. After all, you're here to relax on Cape Cod and any time spent travelling and not soaking up the sun, enjoying the food, and partaking in the festive atmosphere of this fantastic area is a waste.



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Cape Cod National Seashore: More Than Just Beaches
Posted by Kinlin Grover | Monday, February 5, 2018


With nearly 40 miles of shoreline along the Atlantic Ocean, Cape Cod National Seashore is, rightly so, known for its beaches. The area has six main beaches, Coast Guard, Nauset Light, Marconi, Head of the Meadow, Race Point, and Herring Cove, in addition to smaller, lesser known ones, but there is so much more to the area than the waterfront.

In total, the National Seashore is 43,607 acres in size, and there are countless activities to be found in the space that are sure to keep you occupied throughout your vacation.

Want to go hiking? No problem!

Interested in history? We’ve got you covered!  

Love seeing animals? You’ll never run out of opportunities!

Yes, by all means, hit the beaches when you visit Cape Cod National Seashore but don't forget to explore the other sites and activities that this beautiful and diverse area has to offer. We’re confident you’ll love what you see.

A Little Bit of History

On an official basis, Cape Cod National Seashore is relatively new, as it was given its national park status in 1961 by President John F. Kennedy. Kennedy and his family spend plenty of time vacationing on Cape Cod, and he wanted to preserve this exceptional region for future generations.

Overall, however, the land has been in use for about 9,000 years, when it was first inhabited by American Indians.

The first Europeans made their way to the region in 1620, spending about a month here before finally settling in what is now Plymouth. The area was attractive to settlers in future years because of its abundance of fresh water, fertile land, and protective landscape.

Cape Cod National Seashore has deep colonial roots that become clearer and clearer the more you spend time here. But first, you’ll want to get to know the natural environment, which is why so many people visit in the first place.

Hiking and Biking Trails

Feel like going for a hike? There are plenty of places to do so. In the South Wellfleet area sits Atlantic White Cedar Swamp Trail, a moderately challenging hiking area that goes through an oak and pine forest before coming out in a swampy area with a boardwalk. The trail is just over a mile in length, so it can be completed quickly.

Pilgrim Spring is another short hiking trail in North Truro. The path is relatively simple, with a moderate grade and plenty of on-site parking, and is only 0.7 miles long. The site leads to the place where the pilgrims first tasted fresh water on Cape Cod, making it a historically significant trail, as well.

For a biking experience, Nauset Marsh Trail provides a comfortable ride with the option to extend the trip to Coast Guard Beach. The actual trail is a 1.3-mile loop and is peaceful, with very few elevation changes, and has some breathtaking views along the way.

Wildlife Encounters

While you're out and about, keep an eye out for some of the area's unique wildlife. More than 450 animal species live at Cape Cod National Seashore, including 25 protected species and 32 endangered or rare species.

On the coastline, you could encounter large marine mammals, turtles, gulls, and waterbirds. As you move inland, you are more likely to see the land mammals and reptiles that live in the woodland, swaps, and grasslands. One particular animal to keep an eye out for is the piping plover, a rare bird that nests in the sand. About 5% of the world's population of piping plover live at Cape Cod National Seashore.

The Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary is one place worth checking out nearby because it has salt marshes and woodlands that are a hot spot for wildlife sightings.

You might also consider taking a boat trip out into the ocean if you have your heart set on seeing some sea mammals up close. If you're lucky, you might even come across the endangered North Atlantic right whales that feed off Race Point.

Landmarks and Sights

Sitting in Eastham between Coast Guard Beach and the Salt Pond Visitors Center is Doane Rock, a large boulder left behind by the Laurentide Ice Sheet, which covered most of Canada and large chunks of the United States, about 15,000 years ago.

As the story goes, when the glaciers melted, they left behind some geological abnormalities and one of them is this rock. It is named after John Doane, a deacon who was one of the first settlers in the area. He lived on this land in 1644, in a time when very few Europeans were around. The rock’s appearance might not blow you away, but it’s worth having a look at if you have the time because of its history.

After that, swing by The Three Sisters Lighthouses or Nauset Light while in Eastham, The Pilgrim Monument and Race Point Light in Provincetown, and Highlands Light in Truro. There is something that draws people to lighthouses and monuments, and these are some of the most prominent on The Cape.

Museums and Visitor Centers

We mentioned the history of the area before and what better way to learn about the history of Cape Cod National Seashore than by spending time at a museum?

In the north, you have options like Provincetown Museum, which is right at Pilgrim Monument, and Old Harbor Life-Saving Station Museum, on Race Point Beach.

Moving further south, Highland House in Truro and The 1869 Schoolhouse Museum in Eastham are worth a visit, especially if Cape Cod's history excites you the way it does for many other people who spend time here.

The area’s visitor centers are top-notch when learning about what makes the district so distinctive. The Salt Pond Visitor Center is perhaps the top choice, as it is full of interactive displays and shows educational films. There is also an on-site museum and bookshop.

Further north is The Province Lands Visitor Center, a smaller building that also shows educational films in its indoor theater and has a bookstore. The building has an observation deck, as well, which provides panoramic views of the ocean, sand dunes, Pilgrim Monument, and Race Point.

Embrace Life Away From the Beach

Of course, you’re sure to get plenty of beach time in when visiting Cape Cod in the summer. After all, that’s probably the reason why you’re visiting this area in the first place. At the same time, it’s good to know that there are plenty of other activities to keep you occupied when spending time at Cape Cod National Seashore.

If you ever need a day away from the beach to let your sunburn heal or relax away from the heat, the National Seashore has you covered. So, plan your next Cape Cod Vacation around the Cape Cod National Seashore and you will soon notice that Cape Cod National Seashore is unlike the other National Parks you have visited in the past.



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Finding Cape Cod's Secret Beaches
Posted by Kinlin Grover | Wednesday, January 24, 2018


If you’re heading to Cape Cod this summer, you’ll surely check out some beaches at some point. After all, we’ve got some of the best beaches in the entire country, and you’d be selling your vacation short if you don’t stop by a few of them.

The thing is, you’re not the only one with this idea. Crowds can be an issue at the area’s most popular beaches, making these areas less appealing for those who want to relax. When travelling with kids, you might also want a quieter beach, just to make things easier to handle.

Well-known beaches like Nauset, Coast Guard, and West Dennis, while scenic, are very popular during the summer. There’s also parking, which is another issue altogether.

Luckily, there are a few hidden gems throughout the Cape that you can check out if you are interested in the sand, surf, sun and a more peaceful setting. It doesn’t matter what part of Cape Cod your vacation rental is on, there’s a secret beach nearby.

Thumpertown Beach in Eastham photo credit- Cape Cod Online- Vacation Cape Cod

We'll start this list off with an easy one, as Thumpertown Beach isn't exactly hidden, nor is it difficult to find. The beach is, however, far less crowded than many Cape Cod beaches and provides a quiet place to enjoy the sun. The beach is popular with locals who don't want to navigate the crowds of Sunken Meadow Beach and First Encounter Beach, which flank Thumpertown Beach. Best of all, this beach has a small parking lot and stairs running down to the sea, making it accessible for everyone.

You can get to Thumpertown Beach quickly from Route 6 in Eastham. Look for McKoy Road and then take it to Thumpertown Road, where you'll come across the parking lot. The beach is excellent for family vacations because the parking lot is close to the water.

Bound Brook Island Beach in Wellfleet

Making the trek to Bound Brook Island Beach is all about the views. On a clear day, you can stand on one of the 50-foot-high sand dunes overlooking the water and see Provincetown to the north and Plymouth to the west, all the way across Cape Cod Bay.

To get to the beach, you'll have to take Bound Brook Island Road, which is mostly dirt, all the way to a dirt parking lot. The road isn’t well-marked, but you will see a sign directing you to Atwood Higgins House. It might look like you’re heading down a private driveway, but you’re not. Keep going, and you’ll eventually find parking. Once you reach the parking area, it's a bit of a hike down to the water, and you'll have to navigate the dunes along the way. Hey, no one said finding your own personal paradise was going to be easy.

Cow Yard Landing in Chatham

A beach that's not really hidden, but isn't busy either, is found in North Chatham. Cow Yard Landing beach is more for boating than anything else, as you'll see a number of watercrafts in the ocean, making it a great place to stop if you're looking to do some kayaking.

Luckily, the beach is easy to find, as Cow Yard Landing sits in a residential area just off Old Harbor Road and close to Route 28. There's plenty of parking along Cow Yard Lane, as well, so you won’t have to worry about searching for a spot.

Crowes Pasture Beach in Dennis

Discover one of the more secluded beaches on Cape Cod in the Crowes Pasture Conservation area in Dennis. It will necessitate some effort to reach the beach, as you'll walk a mile-long trail through some marshland to get to the sand from the parking area. The good news is this beach is basically untouched by civilization, other than some oyster farms, providing a rustic experience.

To reach the beach, exit Old King's Highway at South Street and follow the signs directing you to the Crowes Pasture Conservation Area. Follow the signs to the parking area and go from there.

Cape Cod Museum Of Natural History in Brewster

Perhaps the simplest seashore on this list to find, due to its location directly behind the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History in Brewster, this beach is well worth the stroll. The seaside area is massive, with tons of white sand and space to stretch out away from the crowds.

While you can't park right at the museum, unless you're a paying customer, spots are available at Drummer Boy Park. From the park, it's a five-minute walk along Main Street, or Route 6, to the museum and then a short stroll along a marked trail to the water.

Forget About the Crowds

If the crowds are the one thing keeping you away from the beaches of Cape Cod, all it takes is a little effort to find a flawlessly secluded location to enjoy. Peace and quiet are abundant all over The Cape, even in the summer; all you have to do is know where to look.

When you plan your Cape Cod Vacation, whether you're looking for activities for your children or you want to sit on the beach with absolutely nothing to do, there's fun for everyone on Cape Cod's scenic beaches.

*Photo Credit CapeCodOnline.com



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Activities for Kids of All Ages on Cape Cod!
Posted by Kinlin Grover | Monday, January 22, 2018


When you think of Cape Cod, you might envision lounging on a sunny beach, eating at elegant restaurants, and enjoying a quiet drink on a secluded patio somewhere near the ocean. In short, your initial thought might not include your children.

The good news, should you want to bring your kids, is that Cape Cod is perhaps one of the most family-friendly destinations on the East Coast. In fact, it doesn’t matter if it is sunny or rainy, summer or winter, or anywhere in between, Cape Cod has your kids covered throughout your vacation. Cape Cod National Seashore- Vacation Cape Cod

Tons of Outdoor Activities

If you’re coming to Cape Cod during the summer months, expect to spend most of your time outdoors. People head to the Cape to enjoy the natural environment, and it’s no different when travelling with children, as various kid-centric activities exist throughout the area.

Kid’s Fishing is a company that operates fishing boats just for children. The company provides all the necessary equipment, and since the vessel heads out into protected waters, you don’t have to worry about your little ones on the sea. The 90-minute excursion leaves from Main Street in Hyannis and is sure to be a highlight of the summer for your kids.

West Yarmouth is home to the Cape Cod Inflatable Park, a large amusement center with water slides, bouncy castles, and obstacle courses. There is a challenge zone for older children, a toddler zone for the young ones, and even a mini golf course and arcade. The park is the type of place where you can spend an entire day, and your kids will enjoy every second. They’ll get a day full of exercise, as well.

When in Sandwich, check out The Adventure Park at Heritage Museums & Gardens. Here, the kids can walk between the trees on specially constructed bridges and complete over 65 different challenges in the adventure park before finishing up with some zip lining from platform to platform.

One of the top destinations for kids on Cape Cod is Skull Island Adventure Golf & Sports World in Yarmouth. This amusement complex is known for its pirate mini golf course, but it also has go-karts. Other go-kart facilities on Cape Cod include Bud's Go-Karts in Harwich and Cartwheels in South Dennis.

Fancy a swashbuckling adventure with your kin? Welcome aboard Cape Cod Pirate Adventures, matey! This pirate ship takes kids on a treasure hunt into Hyannis Harbor and includes face-painting, the hoisting of a pirate flag, and a number of other activities to keep them entertained the entire time. Landlubber parents are also welcome.

Some Indoor Activities, Too

Nothing ruins family vacations faster than poor weather, and although the weather usually works out on the Cape, there's a chance you'll run into a rainy day or two in the summer. As a result, preparation is vital. Luckily, there's more to Cape Cod than the outdoors, as you're sure to find something for your kids to do inside on those days.

Cape Codder Resort in Hyannis has an indoor water park that is the only one of its type in the area. The park is over 30,000 square feet in size, so it's sure to keep your kids occupied, and has two high-speed water slides that are about 160 feet long. There are a river ride and wave pool, as well, along with a kiddie area. Keep in mind that this park has a retractable roof, which will open up if weather permits.

You might not think of a library as a happening place to hang out in the summer, but if you can't be outside, Provincetown Public Library is worth checking out. The building was constructed in 1874, offers over 40,000 books, and organizes events for kids throughout the year. It’s cheap, convenient, and, best of all, educational for your children.

Coming in the Winter?

Just because you're coming to Cape Cod in the winter doesn't mean you should leave the kids at home. After all, as we’ve covered before, the area is a proverbial winter wonderland and has some of the top Christmas events anywhere in New England.

The fun doesn't stop after Christmas, however, as Cape Cod regards its winter activities seriously. Try taking the family ice skating at one of the many rinks on The Cape. You'll find Tony Kent Arena in South Dennis, Charles Moore Arena in Orleans, and Gallo Arena in Buzzards Bay, so no matter which part of The Cape your vacation rental sits, there’s ice skating nearby.

Don't worry if the weather gets too cold or snowy to head outside, as indoor activities are abundant. Ryan Amusements, which has locations in Buzzards Bay, Falmouth, and South Yarmouth, just to name a few, features bowling and arcade games, making it a great place to escape the cold.

The Cape Cod Children's Museum in Mashpee is another option to consider because of its interactive exhibits and special events for kids.

Your Kids Will Love It

The entire Cape Cod area is set up for families to enjoy and, as you can see, there is no shortage of activities for children young and old. Whether your kids want to learn about the area's natural history or spend an afternoon going on a whale watch excursion, Cape Cod has something for everyone.

Combine the unique activities mentioned here with traditional Cape Cod pastimes like hiking, bike riding, and swimming and you’ll quickly see why the area has been popular with families for decades. Start planning your Cape Cod Vacation now!



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Thinking Ahead to Summer on Cape Cod
Posted by Kinlin Grover | Wednesday, January 3, 2018


With cold temperatures causing problems throughout much of the northern United States, planning your summer vacation might not be a priority. After all, even though we know the cold isn't permanent and sunny days will come again, it's tough to get in the mood to book a beachfront vacation home if you've just finished shoveling six inches of snow.

The truth is that there's no better time to book your vacation than right now because you'll find more rentals available and you can get an early start on planning your activities. In addition, organizing a vacation immediately gives you something to look forward to as you suffer through a few more months of winter.

To help get you in the mood, we're going to use this space to remind you of just how exquisite Cape Cod is in the summer. Here are a few of the things that you can look forward to on the Cape in 2018.

Hit the BeachesCape Cod Beach Summertime

No matter where you choose to stay on the Cape this summer, you are sure to find a beach nearby. Some beaches are busier and livelier than others, but you are sure to find the exact seafront experience you are looking for if you plan early.

As part of the Cape Cod National Seashore, Race Point Beach features a scenic shore, bike trails, and sand dunes. Swimming and surfing are both possible at the beach, although there is a bit of a dropoff, so it might not be ideal for those with small children. This particular beach gets sun all day long in the summer, making it a sunbather's dream.

Mayflower Beach in Dennis is one of the calmer beaches on The Cape and is popular with families because of its shallow water. The beach also has a boardwalk, making it easy to get to the water from its expansive parking lot. If you have children and are staying in Dennis, this is your best bet.

Sitting in the Orleans area, Nauset Beach is a 10-mile-long stretch of sand featuring calm water that is great for swimming. Surfing and off-roading are possible at the beach, as well, making it a choice for those who wish to relax and those who want adventure alike.

Visit Museums and Monuments

Of course, it's not all fun in the sun when visiting Cape Cod, as your vacation can be educational, as well. Since this part of the country is where the pilgrims first settled, you won't find more history anywhere else.

Located in Sandwich, Heritage Museums & Gardens is a former plantation that is now a scenic garden that is open to the public. The museum has a collection of classic cars, an art collection, and working historic carnival rides.

Built sometime between 1907 and 1910, Pilgrim Monument is part of the Provincetown Museum and was created to commemorate the landing of the pilgrims in 1620. The monument remains the tallest granite structure in the entire country.

Like pirates? Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth is one of The Cape's newest museums and contains real treasure from an 18th-century shipwreck. The museum is loaded with history and is well worth checking out during the summer.

Experience the Annual EventsProvincetown Carnival Parade

Cape Cod is known for its annual events and festivals, giving locals and visitors alike something special to do during the summer. If any of these events excite you, book your vacation rental now, so you don't miss out.

Concerts, animals, food, and carnival rides, the Barnstable County Fair truly has it all. The fair takes place in late July every year and provides fun for the entire family.

In mid August, the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra comes to town for the annual Pops by the Sea concert at Hyannis Green Village. You'll want to buy your tickets to this event well in advance, particularly if you plan on attending the pre-concert luncheon.

Provincetown becomes a party town every August during Carnival Week. This annual festival attracts 90,000 people to the area for its parade, cruises, and dance parties. Costumes, floats, and food vendors make the events taking place over the course of the week well worth a visit.

Do Some Hiking, Fishing, and Boating

Of course, getting out there and keeping active in the outdoors is all part of a Cape Cod summer. Going for a bike ride on the Shining Sea Bikeway, hopping aboard the Island Queen Ferry, which travels between Falmouth and Martha's Vineyard, or renting a boat in Wellfleet Harbor are well worth doing during the summer.

No matter which part of Cape Cod you end up staying on, you'll have easy access to some of the best hiking, fishing, and boating opportunities in the entire country.

Look Forward to Warmer Weather

Every day that goes by means we are closer to summer on Cape Cod. While you still have a few months to go, the countdown is on, and before you know it, you'll be relaxing on the beach, enjoying fresh seafood, and taking in everything that summer on the Cape has to offer.

Start planning your Cape Cod summer vacation early in 2018, and you can avoid missing out on the perfect vacation rental on the ideal part of The Cape. By putting your vacation together now, you can make the most of your time on Cape Cod this summer. Visit Kinlin Grover Cape Cod Vacation Rentals and book now. You'll be glad you did!



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Cape Cod Bike Paths
Posted by Kinlin Grover | Monday, December 4, 2017


This is the first in a series of articles about cycling on Cape Cod. Expect in depth articles on individual bike paths in the upcoming months. Bike trails and paths are everywhere on Cape Cod, and this isn't by accident. The presence and design of the trails are purposefully done, as those who planned the bikeways studied similar coastal areas, such as those found in California, and tried to emulate their scenery and accessibility.Cape Cod

The natural beauty of the area means that visitors want to spend their time outdoors and there’s no more convenient or exciting way to experience the environment than by choosing a route and following it for a few miles.

Cycling is popular from early spring through the autumn. Basically, if you don’t see snow on the ground, you are sure to come across locals and tourists alike using the bike paths. While cycling has always had a place on Cape Cod, it really took off following the 1978 purchase of part of the old Pennsylvania Central Railroad grade by the Department of Environmental Management. This purchase provided the land necessary for the Rail Trail, which has become very popular and has helped to create the cycling culture that is present today.

In fact, the popularity of biking has risen to the point where if you visit The Cape and don't get some cycling in, expect some serious questioning from friends and family as to why when you get home.

So get out there and enjoy nature on your next visit to Cape Cod!

Activities Along the Trails

Heading out for a cycle on Cape Cod doesn’t stop at choosing a destination and then starting your journey, as each trail has its own story and a unique set of activities along the way.

Many trails have picnic spots, complete with tables and shade, providing you with everything that you need for a quick meal. These points, which often sit in a state park, are fabulous because you can pack a lunch, eat along the trail, and then return to your vacation rental for dinner.

Some paths, such as those along the National Seashore or in Nickerson State Park, have swimming opportunities, as well. Be sure to pack your swimsuit because you can work up a sweat along the trail and then cool off in the water.

The great thing about accessing a beach via a bike path is that they tend to be away from the roadways and, therefore, are secluded and less crowded. Locals will tell you that the best place to relax on the beach and enjoy the dunes is along an oceanfront trail.

Cycling or Mountain Biking

Don’t know which type of bike to bring to Cape Cod? Well, in short, it depends on the type of bike trail you wish to take. There are numerous paved paths in the area, which you can easily navigate with a road bike. These pathways are well-maintained and smooth, so you won’t have any trouble travelling from place to place.

If you plan on trying some of the unpaved trails in the region, however, a mountain bike is a must. These trails offer a more technical and challenging ride, but the payoff is always worth it.

View, View, and More Views

And when speaking of the payoff, of course, we mean the views. Each bikeway has a different landscape and, therefore, a unique scene to offer those who complete it. One trail might present a panoramic look at a lake, while another might get you up close and personal with a cranberry bog.

There are woodlands, parks, canals, flowers, wildlife, and anything else that you could hope to see on Cape Cod along these trails.

You can also get close to history while taking a bike trip, as bridges, homesteads, and museums seem to pop out of nowhere, allowing to experience one-of-a-kind attractions while out for your cycle.

Rules and Regulations

Before embarking on a cycling journey on The Cape, make sure that you are aware of the rules.

Most of the rules are common sense, as all riders under the age of 16 must wear a helmet, but it is advisable that all bikers have one.

Riders should stay in single file and announce themselves when passing others. It is critical that you don’t ride too fast, either.

Finally, riders should keep to the marked trails because it is illegal to ride your bike off the paths.

Following the rules and guidelines ensures that you'll have fun, and stay safe at the same time.

Go For a Ride

That’s it! You’re now ready to take on the breathtaking and accessible bike trails that line all areas of Cape Cod. It doesn't matter if you're staying in Woods Hole or South Dennis, there is a scenic trail at your disposal.

Just don’t forget to bring or rent a bike on your next visit.



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Cape Cod and Cranberries
Posted by Kinlin Grover | Saturday, November 25, 2017


For many, Cape Cod conjures up images of sand, sun, and relaxation, thanks to its location on the ocean and abundance of beaches. And, let’s face it, that’s a fair assessment, as Cape Cod is one of the nation’s more popular and scenic oceanfront areas, particularly during the summer months.

There’s more to Cape Cod than beaches and relaxation, however. While summer tourism is perhaps the most prominent industry on The Cape, it's not the only one, nor is it the oldest.

The cranberry bogs are as old as Cape Cod itself and remain a significant attraction and export. Cranberry farming is linked to the tourism industry through the various festivals and tours found in the region, as well.

The next time you visit Chatham, Harwich Port, or anywhere else on The Cape, make sure that you stop by a cranberry bog to learn about this superfood and its history in the area, while sampling some locally harvested cranberries.

You won't regret it.

History of Cranberries on Cape Cod

Cape Cod is one of the first places settled by European pilgrims arriving in what is now North America, and cranberries are a native crop in the region, so it makes sense that there is a lot of history regarding this fruit.

Cranberries and Cape Cod in the fall.Referred to as sasumuneash by Native Americans, the berry was first used for its medicinal qualities. In 1816, Henry Hall was the first to cultivate the fruit when he built fences around fields of wild cranberries to protect them from wildlife. The plants thrived under these conditions, and by 1820, Hall was able to ship 30 barrels of the product to New York to sell on the local market.

From there, cultivated cranberry bogs began popping up all over the place, stimulating the local economy when the ship-building industry, an important job-providing industry on Cape Cod in the 1800s, slowed down.

By the 1850s, cultivated cranberry bogs were everywhere on Cape Cod, with the product being shipped all over the eastern United States.

Cape Cod Cranberry Events and Festivals

Festivals and other events go hand-in-hand with the cranberry harvesting season, as locals and visitors alike get together to celebrate another successful season of cranberry production. Organized festivals provide something to do on Cape Cod in the autumn, too.

The Harwich Cranberry Festival is a music festival and craft fair that coincides with the annual cranberry harvest. Admission to the festival is free, and it lasts for two days in September. Wine, beer, and food are sold at the event, as well.

The annual Cranberry Harvest Celebration takes place on Columbus Day weekend and has become a tradition to the people of Cape Cod. The festival is educational, as visitors can watch the harvesting of the berries, and numerous displays are set up to explain the significance of cranberry crops. Cooking demonstrations, helicopter rides, craft fairs, and a farmers' market are among the activities found over the course of the weekend.

There is also a music festival, pony rides, a train, and wagon rides, so the entire family will find something to enjoy. You can even wade into a cranberry bog, should you be into that sort of thing.

Cranberry Bogs and Tours

When the cranberry harvest begins around Labor Day every year, the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers’ Association puts out a list of cranberry bogs that you can visit. Tours are available at many of these bogs, providing insight into the Cape Cod’s vibrant cranberry producing history.

Annie's Crannies, which sits in Dennis, the home of the cultivated cranberry, is a working cranberry farm with an on-site gift shop selling fresh fruit. The farm uses antique screening equipment to check the quality of the berries picked, and even sells honey and beeswax candles.

Local farmers Leo & Andrea Cakounes have a bog in Harwich that is known as the largest organic cranberry farm on Cape Cod. Daily tours run in the spring, summer, and fall and provide insight into the work it takes and the equipment used to create a fully-functional cranberry farm.

A great place to learn about the history of cranberry production on the Cape is Brooks Academy Museum. The museum has artifacts, exhibits, and interactive displays, making it a highly-accessible location for guests of all ages. In October, the institution puts on cranberry bog tours, as well.

Cranberry Vacation on Cape Cod

If you’ve ever wanted to learn more about the history of cranberries on Cape Cod and Massachusetts in general, fall is the time to visit area because you'll find many different events to experience.

By taking a tour or hitting up a festival, you can discover more about this native plant species and impress your friends when you know the difference between Early Blacks and Howes varieties of cranberries.

Cape Cod is waiting for you



Cape Cod Fall Festivals Vacation

Welcome to the Kinlin Grover Vacation Rentals Blog
Posted by Kinlin Grover | Friday, November 3, 2017


Kinlin Grover Vacation Rentals BrewsterThank you for stopping by Kinlin Grover Vacation Rentals' brand new blog. In this space, you can expect to find coverage of any and all topics related to Cape Cod. These posts will provide insight into the area and to let you know how The Cape offers more than meets the eye.

We hope to enlighten and entertain you while providing valuable content about the various communities that make up Cape Cod. We’ll also let you know why you shouldn't miss these places when you’re in the area.

We’re not going to bore you with topics that have been re-hashed over and over again, but will rather provide you with information that you can use in your everyday life. 

And, of course, we encourage you to check out some of the over 750 vacation homes that we have for rent on Cape Cod. Keep in mind that Cape Cod is about 70 miles long, so there are plenty of locations from which to choose, each coming with its own unique touches and attractions.

About Cape Cod

If you’ve never been to Cape Cod, it’s good to start by learning a little bit about the region. So in about 100 words:

The Cape has a colorful history dating back to 1620 when the Pilgrims entered Cape Harbor (now Provincetown Harbor) for the first time. In 1639, the first towns on Cape Cod were incorporated, and from there the region has developed into one of the country’s more popular tourist destinations. 

Today, Cape Cod is an area featuring the widest sea-level canal in the world, an abundance of cranberry bogs, a myriad of scrub oak and pine forests, and the best seafood in the United States.

It is a region with beautiful, sandy beaches, whale-watching opportunities, and a culture that is as unique as the dunes on the Cape Cod National Seashore.

So there is Cape Cod in a nutshell. But what else goes on here? There must be something in particular that brings visitors back year after year.

The short answer is that it’s not one sole aspect of Cape Cod that brings people back, it’s the package as a whole.

There’s too much to touch upon in a single blog post, which is why we’re going to cover a variety of topics over the coming weeks and months to give visitors a better idea of what this wondrous peninsula has in store for them. 

The Sections

We’ll definitely explore the four sections that make up Cape Cod because each section has its own unique features. The sections have different geography, different people, different events and, despite their similarities, are all-around different places.

From the history of Bourne, Sandwich and the rest of the Upper Cape to the beaches in Barnstable and Yarmouth of Mid Cape. From the incredible parks in Brewster and Harwich in the Lower Cape to the fishing in Truro and Provincetown in the Outer Cape, we’ll cover it all.

What to Expect

For the most part, the posts on this blog will be applicable to you if:

•    You're looking to vacation on Cape Cod for the first time
•    You want to get more out of your next holiday on Cape Cod
•    You hope to learn about Cape Cod before deciding to vacation here

Make sure that you check back regularly if you fall into any of those categories. 

Topics that we’re sure to touch upon here include:

•    Activities and features that are unique to Cape Cod
•    Hiking, cycling and adventure opportunities
•    The best places to find chowder, lobster rolls, and oysters
•    Where to go boating, sailing, fishing, and swimming
•    Why Cape Cod Christmas and New Years are special

So check back often and tell your friends because we’re going to dig deep into all things Cape Cod on the Kinlin Grover Vacation Rentals blog.



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